Traumatic Brain Injury

shutterstock_107615549
Traumatic Brain Injury
Many times, an accident results in brain bruising, bleeding, tearing and swelling. More than 40% of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) incidents occur as a result of vehicle accidents. It’s imperative to understand that not all injuries are immediately apparent. It’s not unusual for an auto accident victim to feel “fine” right after the event, only to have experienced serious, even life-threatening injuries that are not diagnosed until later.

Of the 1 million people examined each year after suffering a blow to the head, 50,000 to 100,000 of those individuals will experience prolonged problems that significantly affect their lives, including their ability to work. If there is any chance you have had a head injury due to an accident, it is vital that you seek prompt medical attention.

Falls are the leading cause of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). More than 5.3 million Americans are currently living with long-term disabilities as a result of TBI. Every year at least 1.4 million people in this country will suffer a TBI.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the signs and symptoms of TBI may not always be obvious until days, or even weeks, after the initial injury. Due to the very nature of TBI, it is often the injured parties family and close friends that first notice TBI symptoms, rather than the TBI victim themselves. Common signs and symptoms include:

  • Headaches or neck pain that don’t fade away
  • Difficult remembering, concentrating or making decisions
  • Slow thinking, speaking, acting or reading
  • Easily lost or confused
  • Constant tiredness; lack of energy and motivation
  • Changes in mood; sadness or anger for no apparent reason
  • Changes in sleep patterns; difficulty sleeping
  • Light-headedness, dizziness, loss of balance
  • Nausea
  • Increased sensitivity to light, sounds or distractions
  • Blurred vision; eyes become tired more easily
  • Loss of senses, including smell or taste
  • Ringing in the ears

Children suffering from TBI can have the same symptoms as an adult, but may not be able to explain what they are feeling. If your child has been in an accident or suffered head trauma, be aware of any of the following signs and contact your doctor right away.

  • Tiredness, listlessness
  • Crankiness or irritability that cannot be consoled
  • Changes in eating (won’t eat or nurse)
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Changes in play
  • Changes in school performance
  • Last of interest in favorite toys, activities
  • Loss of new skills, such as toilet training
  • Unsteady walking; loss of balance
  • Vomiting

Have you or someone you love suffered injuries or medical conditions as a result of an accident caused by someone else’s negligence? It is important that you contact legal counsel as soon as possible. The preservation of evidence needed to prove your claim is of utmost importance and may be lost or destroyed if not preserved immediately. Contact our office today to schedule your free initial consultation.